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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1834/1307

Title: Distribution and relationships of heavy metals in the giant clam (Tridacna maxima) and associated sediments from different sites in the Egyptian Red Sea Coast
Other Titles: توزيع وعلاقات العناصر الثقيلة فى الكائن الصدفى الكبير (نراى داكنا مكسيما) والرواسب المصاحبة من مناطق مختلفة للساحل المصرى للبحر الاحمر
Authors: Madkour, H.A.
ASFA Terms: Accumulation
Chemical analysis
Clam culture
Issue Date: 2005
Publisher: Alexandria: National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries
Citation: Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research, 31 (2), p. 45-59
Abstract: The giant clam (Tridacna maxima) and sediments have been collected from clean and contaminated coastal sites of the Egyptian Red Sea. Selected samples of the giant clam shells and the associated surface sediments were analyzed for Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni and Cd. Significant spatial differences in metal concentrations in Tridacna maxima and sediments were identified. Copper and lead are greatly enriched in the giant clam shells, which is related to their physiological function. Cd content is higher in Tridacna maxima than in sediments, because of the easy substitution between Cd and Ca. The levels of most metals in the giant clam shells and sediments were higher in the anthropogenic sites than in the uncontaminated sites. Generally, metal variations reflect natural conditions and human activity. Moreover, there are no clear relationships between concentrations of heavy metals in the giant clam shells and those in sediments.
Description: This journal is published by National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Alexandria, Egypt
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1834/1307
ISSN: 1687-4285
Appears in Collections:Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research

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